Click Here To Go To Psycho Solo Diver
66 Days 16 Hours 57 Minutes Until The Beginning Of The 2016 California Lobster Season!
  • HOME
  • Categories

  • Blogroll

    Diver Directory - Links to Scuba Diving Websites

    Blog Search: The Source for Blogs
    Sports Listed in LS Blogs the Blog Directory and Blog Search Engine

    Archives

  • July 2016
  • June 2016
  • May 2016
  • April 2016
  • March 2016
  • February 2016
  • January 2016
  • December 2015
  • November 2015
  • October 2015
  • September 2015
  • August 2015
  • July 2015
  • June 2015
  • May 2015
  • April 2015
  • March 2015
  • February 2015
  • January 2015
  • December 2014
  • November 2014
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • July 2014
  • June 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • March 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • September 2009
  • August 2009
  • July 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • April 2009
  • March 2009
  • February 2009
  • January 2009
  • December 2008
  • November 2008
  • October 2008
  • September 2008
  • August 2008
  • July 2008
  • June 2008
  • May 2008
  • April 2008
  • March 2008
  • February 2008
  • January 2008
  • December 2007
  • November 2007
  • October 2007
  • September 2007
  • August 2007
  • July 2007
  • June 2007
  • May 2007
  • April 2007
  • March 2007
  • February 2007
  • January 2007
  • December 2006
  • November 2006
  • October 2006
  • September 2006
  • August 2006
  • July 2006
  • June 2006
  • May 2006
  • April 2006
  • March 2006
  • February 2006
  • January 2006
  • December 2005
  • November 2005
  • October 2005
  • September 2005
  • August 2005
  • July 2005
  • June 2005
  • May 2005
  • April 2005
  • March 2005
  • February 2005
  • January 2005
  • December 2004
  • November 2004
  • October 2004
  • September 2004
  • August 2004
  • July 2004
  • June 2004
  • May 2004
  • April 2004
  • March 2004
  • February 2004
  • January 2004
  • December 2003
  • November 2003
  • October 2003
  • August 2003
  • July 2003
  • June 2003
  • May 2003
  • April 2003
  • December 2002
  • November 2002
  • October 2002
  • September 2002
  • Next Page »

    July 10, 2016

    We Are Back In Business! Diving Again After El Nino!

    Holy crap!

    Writing this post, I just realized I haven’t been diving at all this year!

    I am now ashamed, but beach diving conditions have sucked that much, and I haven’t been able to get on a boat either.

    I woke up, checked the swell map, and could not come up with an excuse to not show up at Terranea Resort – and I’m a good liar to myself.

    I met Reverend Al and Randy… we checked the conditions.

    The ocean was flat, the foam was gone.

    Flat conditions.
    The Point looked do-able, but we opted for the Cove and 120 reef, in case visibility sucked so bad, we could easily call the dive.

    All three of us made an easy entrance…

    Logged SCUBA Dive #497

    Dove with Reverend Al and Randy

    The Cove, Terranea Resort, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, USA

    In With: 3000 psi
    Out With: 1000 psi
    Max depth: 42 feet
    Waves: Pretty flat
    Visibility: 10-15 feet
    Water Temperature: 64 degrees
    Air Temperature: 75 degrees
    Total Bottom Time: 42 minutes

    Going Down.
    We surface swam all the way out, and dropped near 120 reef.

    We decided that Randy would lead; he didn’t have a compass, so we all agreed that that would make the dive more interesting.

    Reverend Al, the master of underwater navigation, said that he would lead us back when done.

    Following my leaders.

    Visibility was not that great, but I did not care.

    Reef off of Terranea Resort

    We took a slow, steady course, re-exploring the 120 reef that we have been to many times before.

    The storms and swells have rearranged the familiar shore and seascape.

    Feeding The Fish
    We fed the fish.

    A Black Sea Bass
    The highlight of our dive – a Black Sea Bass, the size of a Trabant!

    The Black Sea Bass hung out with us for a bit.

    After about 35 minutes, Reverend Al lead us back to a perfect, spot on and easy exit.

    Revereand Al, Randy and Me.
    Reverend Al, Randy and Me.

    What a wonderful day!

    I will take 10 to 15 of visibility than no diving at all!

    June 30, 2016

    The Rotting Dolphin Project

    I wasn’t able to get on a boat this month, so yes, I have remained dry.

    I feel as though I have gained a few pounds, so I hope I can still fit into my wet suit when I finally get back into the water.

    Anyway, I came across a sort of bizarre article about a guy who obtained a dead dolphin and then sunk it to the bottom of the ocean to document its decomposition.

    Eddie Kisfaludy, a marine biologist and National Geographic grantee, received a call from a guy who found a dead dolphin that was washed up on shore.

    Instead of throwing the dolphin in the trash, it was re-purposed for his experiment.

    A SCUBA Diver

    According to the article, the dolphin was placed at a “shallow” 180 feet where the rotting corpse created a whole new mini-ecosystem.

    A rotting Dolphin

    As strange as this world has been lately, Kisfaludy has been given credit as the first guy to ever document the underwater decomposition of a dolphin.

    A rotting Dolphin

    The entire article, with a short video, can be found here: Filming a Time-Lapse of a Dolphin Carcass on the Seafloor is No Easy Task

    Next Page »




    RSS Subscribe
    Subscribe!

    Follow this blog on Facebook

    Follow this blog on twitter

    QR Code

     

     

     

     

     

    ©Copyright 2002-2016 Psychosolodiver.com. All Rights Reserved. However, if you are going to steal anything from this site, please give me credit and link back.